IBX5980432E7F390 The Influence of Bacson-Hoabinh Cultural Development with Early Community Development in the Indonesian Archipelago - The Art of Information

The Influence of Bacson-Hoabinh Cultural Development with Early Community Development in the Indonesian Archipelago

The Influence of Bacson-Hoabinh Cultural Development with Early Community Development in the Indonesian Archipelago

Bacson-Hoabinh Culture In the Bacson Mountains and in Hoabinh Province near Hanoi, Vietnam, researchers Madeleine Colani discovered a large number of tools known as Bacson-Hoabinh culture. Similar types of tools are also found in Thailand, Malay Peninsula, and Sumatra. Relics in Sumatra are clam hills called kjokkenmoddinger (kitchen waste) extending from North Sumatra to Aceh. The hallmark of the Bacson-Hoabinh culture is the flaking on one or both sides of the stone surface of one fist and a very sharp edge. The results of the shaking show various shapes, such as oval, rectangle, and some are waist-shaped.

In Indonesian territory, the Bacson-Hoabinh cultural stone tools are found in Papua, Sumatra, Sulawesi and Nusa Tenggara. The spread of Bacson-Hoabinh culture coincides with the migration of the Melanesoid Papuan race to Indonesia through the western and eastern (north) roads. They came to the archipelago in a boat and lived on the east coast of Sumatra and Java, but they were pressed by the later Malay race. Finally, they withdrew to the eastern part of Indonesia and became known as the Papuan race which at that time was underway Mesolitikum culture so that the supporters of Mesolitikum culture is Papua Melanesoid. This Papuan race lives and lives in caves (abris sous roche) and leaves clam hills or kitchen waste (kjokkenmoddinger).

Papuan race Melanesoid arrived in the archipelago during the Holocene period. At that time the state of our earth is inhabitable so that it becomes a comfortable place for human life. The kjokkenmoddinger investigation was performed by Dr. P.V. Van Stein Callenfels 1925. Also found many hand-held axes, then called Sumatra axes, made of broken stone, the outer side is not smoothed, and the inside is done as needed. The other type is the short ax (hache courte), the shape is half-circle, the sharp part on the side of the arch. Also found grinding stone (pincer) as a food grinder or red paint, the tip of the arrow, flakes, and ax Proto Neolitikum

Papuan race Melanesoid life is still half-settled, hunting, and simple farming. They live in the cave and some are in the garbage hill. Humans living in Mesolitikum cultural age are familiar with the arts, such as wild boar-like paintings found in the Leang-Leang Cave (Sulawesi). The painting contains pictures of animals and palm stamp. Bodies buried in caves or clam hills with a squatting attitude, some parts of the corpse smeared with red paint. Red is the color of blood, the sign of life. The corpse was smeared with red in order to restore life to dialogue. Except for stone tools, also found the remains of animal bones and teeth such as elephants, rhinos, bears, and deer. So, in addition to collecting shellfish, they also hunted big animals.

In the Sumatra region, the Bacson-Hoabinh cultural stone tools are found in Lhokseumawe and Medan. On the island of Java, cultural tools similar to the Bacson-Hoabinh culture are found in the area around Bengawan Solo, at the same time as ancient human fossils were extracted. The found equipment is made in a simple way, not yet flaked and not sharpened. The tool is estimated to be used by Pithecanthropus erectus in Trinil, East Java.

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